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generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
transformation of women writers or literary seekers from the rest of the world. as you know, united states of america, the land i love, the land i have adopted as my home, in recent decades has paid less and less attention to transiti transition, especially to literary translation. the number of books from the middle east and north africa into english -- [inaudible] in the last 32 years, there has been a lot more translation of english literature that there has been in america, from the land that many consider -- >> is there a contemporary woman rider and iran that you would recommend? olutely. let's first say that -- [inaudible] there is a renaissance. there is a renaissance going on in iran. and women are at center stage. let me give you one example about women novelists. in 1947, we have the first major collection of short stories by our foremost woman novelist can and she passed with a couple weeks ago at the age of 19. so women writers are very exceptional. women poets in iran go back over 1000 years, because poetry is more woman kind of art form. you can ride in the privacy of your h
announcing in the quietest most resurgent way possible that i'm grateful to live in the united states of america. that's all. gratitude for the sacrifices of my forebears. gratitude for the opportunity this country a force. gratitude for the men and women who served to fight in the military probably. gratitude for being a part of this amazing, ennobling experience representative democracy. blood, liberals hate the americans event is just okay. not good, not great. serving unexceptional. just okay. conservative women, mouthy ladies. to see some truly a lover i want, in your next conversation with a liberal, i was thinking about something sarah palin said the other day. stanback. led to the huffing and puffing and sighing and moaning begin to get as much as you finish the set by the way. you could say sarah palin likes chocolate ice cream or sarah palin thanks panda bears are cuddly. the result is going to be a kind of deranged automatic rejection of anything sarah palin says or thinks. try with ann coulter. same reaction. actually try with any well-known female who is unapologetically
citizens of the united states. he credited churchill with influencing his ideas on foreign policy and the way he talked with the russian counter parts in years to come. then, a few years later, he see the influence of church hill's words and example on ronald reagan and margaret thatcher and the way they mute the special relationship forward. even gorbachev acknowledged the role of the speech in finding a way forward without resulting to directive war. what can it teach us here in the room? the soviet union is in war? in this age we have turned cynical toward the politician. we too often dismiss a speaker on either side as pulling something over on one of us. somebody who has a lot of say but not a lot to do. but i think the right speech, delivered by the right speaker, at the right time has the power with bringing the nation in to a being. as with the decoration of independents. he has the power to -- he warned hit hitler we shall never surrender. it has the power to aspire our enemies to change. ronald region speaking in berlin to tear down the wall to gorbachev, the berlin wall
in the united states and how it can shift the state's rapidly over time, grace state of nevada. obama is running ahead, not nearly as far as he did in 2008. look at this data. unfortunately it is caught up in the monitor, but you can see that an incredible increase of nine percentage points in the share of eligible voters who are minorities took place according to the data between 2008 and 2012, a massive demographic tide against which the republicans have to run. you can also see that a decline of five percentage points in voters who are white non college which of course john mccain's best corporate 2008. so that is a very quick to work, very quick speed run on some of the swing states of the 2008 election. maybe it's time for the 2012 election, step back, catch my breath and to say, why is this? why is this going on? why is obama have a solid lead like he does? why is romney having such difficulty finding traction? what many people argue to be a very winnable election with up poor, limping along economy in the president who has done some legislative things that, let's face it, or not all that
to show you what's going on in the united states at that time, so that's pretty cool. >> we are back live at theesti e national book festival on the mall in washington, d.c. booktv on c-span2. [applause] and as you can see where the great audience still here in thn history and biography tent. we'rebi joined by jean edward smith, and eisenhowerher and biographer, and, of course, david and julie nixon eisenhower, grandson and granddaughterei in law, and, off course, thought of president nixon. so we are very pleased that o erybody here.we areng t we're going to put the number's up on the screen. the eisenhower's and mr. smith were talking are there with earl jonathan yardley, so you heard a presenout their presentation. we hav one question for each. where people lined up a linda peeno give everybody a chance.cc i'm just going to get mye out o questions out of theut o way rel fast. jean edward smith, did president eisenhower like campaigning? >> certainly not in 1952. in 1952, this was the new job that he had but he learned it effectively ended 1956, he campaigned. no, he did not like it. >>
in the united states are not decided by the popular vote. instead, we have the electoral votes where everybody gets another vote for the states that allocate their electrical votes will so that gives us outcomes in a number of battleground states. this is as we laid it out in the first case. we have six states in the midwest area, ohio, michigan, and ohio, states in the southwest, colorado, new mexico and nevada. virginia and florida in the south. all of the states are pretty different. the six states in the midwest are much more heavy and have a slow level of demographic change and they are more bechler changing slowly. that is favorable in showing preference for barack obama could with that in mind, let's look at some of the particular swing states that are in play. more than any other state, perhaps ohio is one of the pogroms. a state that was believed to be for mitt romney, but if obama holds all six electoral votes, he is only four electoral votes short of victory. critical romney strategy in the state of ohio. that is not happening at this point. at this point, some of the data on the bo
the coal industry in the united states losing as thousands of tens of thousands of jobs instead of pursuing the cleanest technology in the area of coal. my record -- chairman of the house administration. we got rid of the program. the former speaker gave us the savings of equivalence of carbon emissions of one car per year. we have the results in on the program i established which is waste energy. it produces enough energy to light 250 homes 3-year. it reduces that which would go to landfill by 5,000 tons and the number of car equivalence it takes off the street in terms of carbon emissions is almost 900. that is a pretty good record. bera: you are suggesting global warming change we are seeing may not be caused by man-made sources? lungren: my point is we don't know to what extent it is and what moves we would take on our own in the united states will have an effect. at the same time it makes good common sense to attempt to try to reduce carbon emissions where possible. >> moderator: you want to talk about climate change? bera: the climate is changing. we are seeing extremes happen. talk t
$16,000 every second george allen was the united states senator. voted to raise the debt ceiling four times, voted to raise his own salary four times. now he's talking like a conservative, but his record shows he can't have another crack at it because his actions don't match his word. again, i think the right strategy is an aggregated examination of deductions rather than fighting issue-to-issue. you can have the amount or percentage vary by income or how the tax code is already. that's the most likely path to lead to success. >> we're out of time on that answer. >> can i have time to rebut? >> not according to your rules. i like more than less, but going on. >> governor allen, virginia voters are divided on whether they want the affordable care act to stay or go because it's not completely ruled out and because it's so complex. do you want to completely get rid of the law as a stands and start over on health care reform from strach or favor -- scratch or favor another method? >> i'll use the first part to rebut comments tim made. tim talked about $16,000 of debt. now it's the spendin
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12